What does the Digital Sentry Motion and Alarm Detection settings mean in DSAdmin on the cameras Motion TAB?

Issue

What do the Integral Motion or Alarm Detection settings mean in DSAdmin?

Product Line

Pelco Video Management

Environment

DS Admin

Cause

System configuration.

Resolution

MOTION

The Motion tab (see image below) allows you to configure how much motion is required to trigger motion recording. It is also used to create motion masks, which ignore motion in certain areas of a camera's view, and to test your motion setup. Live video from the selected camera is displayed on this tab.

Motion Tab for Motion Settings and Masks

NOTE: If the "Use Motion Detection in IP Camera" option is selected on the General tab for an IP camera, only the Alarm Settings, Pre-Motion Recording, and Post-Motion recording portions of the Motion tab are visible.

Adjust the values for the following parameters to adjust the amount of motion required to trigger motion recording:

  • Sensitivity: The change in a pixel required for that option of the image to be considered changed. The Sensitivity value is expressed as a percentage multiplied by 100. For example, a value of 100 indicates a 1 percent change, 5000 indicates 50 percent, and so forth. A brightness change from black to white would be a change of 10000, or 100 percent. This comparison is performed for all pixels in each image.
  • Unmasked Area % for Motion: The percentage of an image that must change as compared to the reference image for motion recording to be triggered. For example, a value of 10 percent means that one tenth of the pixels in the image must change enough as compared to the reference image for motion to be detected.
  • Reference Count: How often the reference image is updated. A setting of 100, for example, means that every 100th image becomes the new reference. The 99th image would be compared to the first image, whereas the 101st image would be compared to the 100th image.

Motion masks allow even greater control of the motion detection. For example, a camera at a front entrance captures the receptionist's desk. You do not want to record all of the receptionist's normal movements, which would consume valuable disk space storage. You can mask the portion of the camera's view that includes the receptionist's desk to disable detection of activity at the desk. You can create a motion mask as large or as small as you want and in a virtually unlimited number of patterns.

Complete the following steps to create a motion mask:

  1. On the live video pane, click and drag to draw a rectangle that covers all or part of the area you want to mask. Repeat until the entire area you wan to mask is covered.
  2. To eliminate a portion of the mask you created, click and drag the mask to draw a rectangle over the area you want to clear. To eliminate the entire mask, click Clear Mask.
  3. To change the color of the mask, click a color square above the live video pane.

NOTE: If there is only one small area where motion events need to be detected, you can mask that area, and then click the Invert Mask button. This masks all unmasked portions of the video and clears all masked portions.

Perform the following steps to test the motion recording performance of the mask you created:

  1. Click the "Save and Test Mask" button.
  2. Check the following parameters:
    • Max Consecutive: The highest number of consecutive images that exhibited motion during the current test; when motion occurs, a colored border appears around the video pane.
    • Consecutive Frames: The current number of consecutive images that differed enough from the previous image for motion to be recognized. This resets to zero when a change is not recognized in an image.
    • Total: the total number of images that exhibited motion during the test, whether consecutive or nonconsecutive.
    • Total Non-Motion Frames: The number of images during the test that did not exhibit motion.
    • Total Frames: The total number of images displayed and compared during the test.

After the test, assess whether too much or too little of the image is masked and whether the sensitivity is too high or too low. Also assess the consecutive images setting. for example, if a person can walk across the entire camera view while only five images are recorded, the consecutive images setting should be less than five so that such activity is not ignored.

Any changes made on this page for individual cameras are applied when you click Test Mask, even while recording. You cannot change motion settings for more than one camera at a time.

The Motion tab also contains settings that control the triggering of alarms based on motion events. You can configure a zone of camera inputs to begin recording when motion occurs on specific cameras. The settings that control when this recording occurs are found in the Alarm Settings area of the Motion tab. The following settings are available:

  • Consecutive Motion Frames to Trigger Alarm: The number of consecutive motion images that must occur on the selected camera input to activate recording on all cameras in the zone.
  • Consecutive Non-Motion Frames for Reset: The number of consecutive non-motion images that must occur to end alarm recording or to begin post-motion recording, if configured.

You can also configure pre- and post-motion recording on the Motion tab. The following settings are available for the Pre-Motion Recording and Post-Motion Recording sections of the Motion tab:

  • Consecutive Motion Frames to Trigger Pre-Motion Recording: The minimum number of consecutive motion images that must occur on the selected camera input for the pre-motion video to be inserted at the beginning of the recorded motion event.
  • Pre-Recording Seconds: The amount of video inserted at the beginning of the recorded motion event when the minimum number of consecutive motion images occur. The images included in the pre-motion segment is determined by counting backward from the final consecutive motion image. The maximum possible Pre-Recording Seconds value is equal to the Maximum Video Buffer setting on the General tab.
  • Consecutive Non-Motion Frames to Start Post Motion Recording: The minimum number of consecutive non-motion images that will end the motion event and start a post-motion recording period. The first image included in the post-motion recording period is the first image after the final consecutive non-motion image.
  • Post-Recording Seconds: The amount of video recorded in the post-motion recording period. This video is appended to the end of the recorded motion event. If the minimum number of consecutive motion images reoccurs during the post-recording period, the post-recording period restarts beginning with the image following the final consecutive motion image.

Related Topics:

Configure cameras to detect motion in Digital Sentry. Article LL#8962