DX8100 troubleshooting hard drive (HDD) procedure

Issue

HOW DO YOU KNOW A HARD DRIVE IS THE PROBLEM?

  1. Get errors during boot up:
    a. Invalid boot disk.
    b. Insert system disk and reboot the system.
    c. System tries to boot from a network server.
    d. Missing or corrupt system files.
    e. S.M.A.R.T warning, press F1 to continue.
  2. Windows “stop” error message (Blue Screen of Death)
  3. DX8100 software freezes up and the system reboots.
  4. System continually reboots at “open PDB”.
  5. Missing days of recorded video.
  6. Fewer days of video storage.
  7. Gaps in recorded video.
  8. DX8100 GUI shows 0 (zero) days of recorded video.
  9. Software stops working and PDB Initialize screen comes up.

Product Line

Pelco Video Management

Environment

  • DX8100 Series
  • Digital Sentry Xpress

Cause

  • Power surges
  • Heat
  • Mechanical Failure
     

Resolution


TOOLS/UTILITIES TO DIAGNOSE HDD PROBLEMS:

  1. Use Windows Explorer to browse the DVRs hard drives.
    a
    . You may get “access denied” or other error message.
    b. Drive may appear to be blank
     
  2. If a drive does not show up in Windows, does BIOS see the drive?
    a
    . If an expected drive does not show up, reseat its cables.
    b. If drive does not come back online, replace the drive.
     
  3. Use windows disk management to view the status of the drives.
    a.
    Look for drives that are “offline”, try to make online.
    b. Look for volumes that show “at risk”, run chkdsk on these drives.
     
  4. Use chkdsk utility with “/f” option to check all drives.
    Open a command prompt and change to the drive letter of a storage drive.
    d: {ENTER}
    chkdsk /x /f {ENTER}
     
  5. If all previous steps don’t help, use chkdsk with “/r” option.
    a
    . This process takes a long time, so use this as last resort.
    b. Watch stage 5 for reports of bad clusters/sectors
    c. Any drive that gets bad clusters should be replaced.
     


IDENTIFY WHICH PHYSICAL DRIVE IS AFFECTED:

  1. Identify which drive is affected by its drive letter (C:, D:, E:, etc.)
     
  2. Go into Windows disk management to identify which disk this is
    a
    . Disk 0 = the drive connected to SATA 0, disk 1 = SATA 1, etc.
     
  3. S.M.A.R.T. warnings refer to drives at the BIOS level:
    a.
    PM = Primary Master = SATA 0.
    b. PS = Primary Slave = SATA 1.
    c. SM = Secondary Master = SATA 2.
    d. SS = Secondary Slave = SATA 3.